1893 Grand Exhibition. The world's intro to PBR, hot dogs, ice cream cones and the Ferris Wheel.

1893 Grand Exhibition. The world's intro to PBR, hot dogs, ice cream cones and the Ferris Wheel.
A view through the wheel. The black, horizontal line is the axle, the single largest forging to that time.
"I don't make hell for nobody. I'm only the instrument of a laughing providence. Sometimes I don't like it myself, but I couldn't help it if I was born smart."

1st Sgt. Milton Anthony Warden.
"From here to Eternity"

Paul Valery

"You are in love with intelligence, until it frightens you. For your ideas are terrifying and your hearts are faint. Your acts of pity and cruelty are absurd, committed with no calm, as if they were irresistible. Finally, you fear blood more and more. Blood and time."

The Wisdom of the Ages

"When a young man, I read somewhere the following: God the Almighty said, 'All that is too complex is unnecessary, and it is simple that is needed',"

Mikhail Kalashnikov
"Here lies the bravest soldier I've seen since my mirror got grease on it."

Zapp Brannigan

Saturday, October 07, 2006

More D-Guards

First off, the pictured knife is a favorite of mine. It probably qualifies as a big'un so I'm leading off with it. It comes with it's copy attached, so I'll not be so tedious as to describe it. I love that oh-so-sensitive inscription. I'm also going to take this oportunity to toot my own horn. The knife of mine that this one "inspired" (I hate that word) was glowingly and graciously reviewed by the madogre, and he didn't pay anything close to ninety-five-hundred bucks for it either.
Another bit of news is that I stumbled across a great website full of photos of Rebel Bowies as well as other stuff.
Now for some more pictures, this time of the smaller ones. I'm going to start with one I affectionately refer to as "the nasty little d-guard". Not fair but it is nothing you'd want to spread your peanut butter with - at least not now. It's a cool little knife anyway, a turned handle with a ferrule and an actually "useful" size blade. It has a characteristic that seems somewhat common among period d-guards though. The guard is so small it looks as if one's fingers would barely fit. It seems like that would sort of dictate the position in which the knife is held although it would probably protect the knuckles better that a wider guard.
A wider guard like the one on the next knife, a very simple elegant little shank, found on the battlefield at Cold Harbor. Love that guard. With the curve and looped end to the quillon, this is a nice one. Next I'm just going to toss some more little ones out for your enjoyment.





















This bottom one is interesting. What with the plaited sheath and antler handle it is unique, majorly tight guard though.








This one is nice as well.

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