1893 Grand Exhibition. The world's intro to PBR, hot dogs, ice cream cones and the Ferris Wheel.

1893 Grand Exhibition. The world's intro to PBR, hot dogs, ice cream cones and the Ferris Wheel.
A view through the wheel. The black, horizontal line is the axle, the single largest forging to that time.
"I don't make hell for nobody. I'm only the instrument of a laughing providence. Sometimes I don't like it myself, but I couldn't help it if I was born smart."

1st Sgt. Milton Anthony Warden.
"From here to Eternity"

Paul Valery

"You are in love with intelligence, until it frightens you. For your ideas are terrifying and your hearts are faint. Your acts of pity and cruelty are absurd, committed with no calm, as if they were irresistible. Finally, you fear blood more and more. Blood and time."

The Wisdom of the Ages

"When a young man, I read somewhere the following: God the Almighty said, 'All that is too complex is unnecessary, and it is simple that is needed',"

Mikhail Kalashnikov
"Here lies the bravest soldier I've seen since my mirror got grease on it."

Zapp Brannigan

Monday, March 23, 2009

More New Knives

Is everyone enjoying the exhilaration of living on the edge of the precipice?
We're truly living in, if not the best of times, at least the most interesting.
Here on the home front, we're broke ("No money. No ride. Hey, back to normal"; Micky Rourke as Henry Chinaski in "Barfly"). We're broke at least until the end of the month or until more knife money comes in.
Notice that I haven't yet stooped to blegging. I don't have a "tip jar" as I think it's tacky to ask for money simply for providing information that's available for free all over the net.
Anyway, nothing motivates like the wolf at the door.
Ergo, new knives:

This is based on a knife from the Flook Book. A slightly more refined version of the classic Brit knuckle knife.

We've seen this guy before way back on Bastille Day. Now he has a sheath.
The link above also illustrates the proper way to hold it.
The predecessor to the massive landslide of Fairbairn/Sykes variations, the BC (British Commando) 41.

This is a WW2 knife, the original of which is for sale at Snyder's Treasures (scroll about 1/3 down).
They call it an Everitt knife but I have my doubts.
Bill Wright's book "Theater Made Military Knives of World War II" says that the Everitt knuckle knives (handles painted black or green) have somewhat obscure origins.
You can see the standard Everitts just below the spike on the Snyder's page.
No ones knows whether "Everitt" was an individual or a firm - nor where they were located, although they most certainly are private-purchase knives from the second war.
Snyder's seems to be basing their decision on the paint color and I aint buyin' it.
But, they have got to call it something.
I call it "The Spike".
Where can one, who's just stumbled in here, find these treasures?
Plowshare Forge.

1 comment:

A said...

I'm taking the brass/ebony KK with me by gum. I'll give you a call.
We go to Camp Bob for three weeks before we really leave, so I should be able to make it happen.
Don't know if a picture of one of your knives on ACU will help or harm sales.

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