1893 Grand Exhibition. The world's intro to PBR, hot dogs, ice cream cones and the Ferris Wheel.

1893 Grand Exhibition. The world's intro to PBR, hot dogs, ice cream cones and the Ferris Wheel.
A view through the wheel. The black, horizontal line is the axle, the single largest forging to that time.
"I don't make hell for nobody. I'm only the instrument of a laughing providence. Sometimes I don't like it myself, but I couldn't help it if I was born smart."

1st Sgt. Milton Anthony Warden.
"From here to Eternity"

Paul Valery

"You are in love with intelligence, until it frightens you. For your ideas are terrifying and your hearts are faint. Your acts of pity and cruelty are absurd, committed with no calm, as if they were irresistible. Finally, you fear blood more and more. Blood and time."

The Wisdom of the Ages

"When a young man, I read somewhere the following: God the Almighty said, 'All that is too complex is unnecessary, and it is simple that is needed',"

Mikhail Kalashnikov
"Here lies the bravest soldier I've seen since my mirror got grease on it."

Zapp Brannigan

Wednesday, May 02, 2012

Frivolous Waste of Time

You should have been clued-up by the title but... since you're here; I'll fill you in on the whys of my going-off-on-a-random-tangent-ism (That's just not like me):
The world has gone way interesting lately. My president, with major help from the opposing party, is continuing (effortlessly apparently) to make the Republican party look stupid.
As a two-time Reagan voter, my feeling is that it couldn't be happening to a nicer bunch of willfully-ignorant shitheads.
So, to bleed off some of this "I-can't-believe-how-dumb-these-dipshits-are energy, I've come up with an interesting (I hope) adventure through a completely hypothetical night in London, circa 1964.
So stay with me please, else I go all Cake-Boss on Larry Correia.

Okay, early sixties. Music-wise, lots of different things in the buffet: There was folk music (The real stuff like "Barbara Allen") and "new" folk music which I have far less interest in) so that's where we're going first.
One of the hot acts in 1964 was Chad and Jeremy.
 



Although these guys were Brits, they were far more popular in the States.
It makes sense. nationality notwithstanding, they do sound a bit Greenwich-Village-Folk-Scene, Pete Seeger... you know: Kingston Trio-ish.
Although C&J had a big following over here, back in their homeland, their asses were being kicked by...
Oh God, how to start...
First off: This isn't Bizarro world.
I've doctored nothing. Everything is what it is.
Other than that, as far as comfort goes, I got nothin'.
C&J's competition happened to be the same thing as they were - only different.
Next stop on our imaginary pub-crawl is... whatever imaginary venue  would have been presenting...
Peter and Gordon!
Obviously the shorter guy with the glasses in both groups has switched places with the taller guy but... Same guys?
Of course not!
But, it's hard to ignore the similarities; ie: both of the members of both duos are excellent musicians.
Really, seriously tight harmonies (Someone's been listening to their Everly Brothers) and, in both cases, it's the dorkier-looking (Admit it) guy who plays the solo.
Quality-wise, it's a tossup. P&G have a leg up with the fact that "World Without Love" is a Lennon-McCartney song... but... they look like they're twelve!
And what's up with the taller guy... I don't know. tragic poet maybe...
And the one with the specs... I just want to demand his lunch money.
So, yeah, the optics suck. It's far better on the radio.
I know...  Boring!  The curse of folk music.
Despair not! Our pretend night-on-the-town isn't over yet.
So far, with our first two stops we've, of course, been iimagining that we could have seen both C&J and P&G - on the same night - in London.
Probably unlikely but I'm pretty sure that, in the real world of the day, would, one could always repair to The Railway Hotel (Hear later about its class and glitter).
The band playing there marketed themselves as "Maximum R&B" and may even have been the house-band for a time.
Anyway, go easy on these lads.
They were just kids, givin' it their best shot.
Hell, the drummer was only seventeen at the time.

Live at The Raiway Hotel...
"The High Numbers".


Anyone who needs to ask who that was... is living a stunted existence and is blind to joy.
I don't make the rules.

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